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The first Doctor?
Although it's traditional to refer to the William Hartnell incarnation as the "first" Doctor, there were eight before him. These incarnations are seen clearly during the mind-wrestling sequence in The Brain of Morbius.
Information about the first eight incarnations is sketchy and scarce. The best source is Cold Fusion, in which Patience remembers her husband as one of the first explorers of the time vortex - a hero revered by the Time Lords even though they've forgotten his name. (Although, it has to be said that her confused memories could be mixing up various people she has known: Omega, the Other, the Doctor's father, as well as the Doctor himself.) She particularly recalls being married to the Doctor's fourth incarnation, and his regenerating into the fifth. At this time, the Doctor is a member of the Supreme Council, with 13 children and his first grandchild soon to be born. But the family are arrested after it is decreed that no more Time Lords shall be born of woman - only the Loom-born will rule Gallifrey. The Doctor is not present when the guards arrive, and we can only speculate what happens to him next. Maybe he escapes from Gallifrey, and spends the subsequent three incarnations as a fugitive. What is certain is that the Doctor eventually returns to Gallifrey and is born from the Loom of Lungbarrow as the Hartnell incarnation, with little or no memory of having lived before. As far as his cousins are concerned, he's a new person. Perhaps this was imposed upon him as a form of punishment - but I prefer to think that the Doctor has done something clever to elude his pursuers. He has regenerated, but arranged things so it appears he's being woven from the Loom. The fact that he still has a navel shows he's really the same womb-born Time Lord as the previous eight incarnations. (And indeed in Lungbarrow, the young Doctor says that he can remember being in the Loom, waiting to be born, which is dismissed as "impossible".)
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Ambassadorial status
The notion of the Doctor serving as an ambassador has precedent in the series - it is presumably in this capacity that he first met Dastari. In the two missions presented here, the Tardis is nowhere to be seen - presumably the Doctor travels by Time Ring. In the first mission, he is dressed in some sort of spacesuit. The second assignment could be some considerable time later - the Doctor has now adopted an Edwardian costume. The fact that he encounters the Daleks here, and indeed makes peace with them, is forgotten later on.
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Departing Gallifrey
One of the more nebulous areas in the Doctor's backstory is his flight from Gallifrey. The tv episodes offer contradictory information about it. Several different authors have attempted to depict it, with different results each time. Here, I'm trying to reconcile these different accounts into a whole. In Nightshade, the Doctor is shown entering the Tardis on his own - no sign of Susan or the Hand of Omega - and dressed in Time Lord robes. It could be that this is a clandestine trip he's undertaking to test how easy it will be to get away. Alternatively, he could be responding to a stronger impulse. Though his original memories were suppressed at the time of his Looming, he might have left himself some post-hypnotic commands - such would explain his returning to the past, to rescue Patience and her granddaughter, as seen in flashback in Cold Fusion. Patience recognizes that the Doctor is wearing her husband's ring.
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Susan
Susan is of course the Doctor's granddaughter - but again, we have different stories about her origins. In Cold Fusion, we learn that the Doctor's granddaughter is born just as his family are being arrested in the persecution of the womb-born. Patience recalls the first Doctor arriving to spirit her and the granddaughter away. Was this Susan? Presumably the Doctor then took her to the Old Time, where we next see her. However, in Lungbarrow, Susan is said to be the granddaughter of the Other, trapped on Gallifrey during a time of civil war. When the first Doctor turns up, she recognizes him as her grandfather. As the Other had thrown himself into the Looms, the implication is that his essence has somehow been reborn in the Doctor. As I've said above, the Doctor was not really Loom-born, but it is possible that he picked up some of the Other's life force as he passed through. Both of these accounts of Susan's origin come with the caveat that they're memories of uncertain provenance - I suspect that the truth is somewhere in between. When we see the Doctor and Susan entering the Tardis in Time & Time Again, it's also to escape some sort of civil war or revolution, which could tie in with Lungbarrow - although the implication is that they're leaving contemporary Gallifrey, as it is in The Name of the Doctor and The Exiles. Did they therefore return to modern times? How did the Doctor explain Susan on a world with no more children? The highly-stylized account in The Longest Story in the World suggests there may have been difficulties. The other account of their departure is in Birth of a Renegade. Again, the Doctor seems to be fleeing a contemporary civil war/revolution - although his memories of it are vague and have apparently been selectively wiped. He finds a 7 year old Susan hiding in the Tardis, and adopts her as his "granddaughter". Here, she is said to be the Lady Larn, the last surviving descendant of Rassilon. It is possible though that the Doctor is deliberately misremembering events in order to confound the Master.
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Earthman?
Where's Susan in these stories? I've decided to place them here rather than later on with the other Annual stories as they seem to chronicle early voyages - The Sons of the Crab is the first time the Doctor has been outside the Milky Way, and The Lost Ones is his very first visit to Vortis. But they need to go after Frayed as that documents the Doctor's first encounter with humanity. (I'll gloss over his earlier ambassadorial work - there have been enough mind-wipes and memory losses to forget about that - this might also explain why he doesn't remember the Daleks...) What's interesting about these tales is that the Doctor refers to himself as human and coming from Earth. So is it possible that he's settled on Earth for a while, long enough to think of it as home? It's even possible that he has family living there. Think back to the pre-Hartnell incarnations - what was the Doctor up to during his three incarnations on the run? Perhaps he was rescuing members of his family who had escaped the purge - where better for the half-human Doctor to take them than the Earth, his mother's home planet? If some of his children ended up living on Earth, that would explain how two Earth children can turn up later as his grandchildren - also that would be someone to leave Susan with while he explores. It's interesting to note that the Tardis is already in police box form in these tales, before the chameleon circuit has actually stuck. We could infer that the police box is a default setting for visiting twentieth century England, and that the Doctor has temporarily switched off the circuit.
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Give-a-Show
I've cheated a bit here. Rather than treating each of the Projector slides as a separate story, I've arranged them into a single epic tale. After first discarding four slides that were essentially re-tellings of tv stories (The Secrets of the Tardis deriving from An Unearthly Child; Doctor Who in Lilliput from Planet of Giants; On the Planet Vortis and The Zarbi Are Destroyed from The Web Planet) I rearranged the other 12 into a travelogue-style story, culminating in a battle with the Daleks, making use of the new order to reinforce continuity. So for instance, the Watermen could have given Ian the ray pistol he uses on the Aquafien; and the scientist rescued from the Daleks is the one who invents the weapon that repels their invasion.
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First Doctor solo?
The Hartnell era is perhaps the most tightly-knit segment of Doctor Who: many stories leading into the next, and a continuous roster of companions. Just about the only place where there seems a distinct break between stories is after The Dalek Masterplan. Some considerable time seems to have passed by The Massacre - the Doctor and Steven are back to normal, and make no mention of the cataclysmic events on Kembel. So this is clearly the place to insert extra stories. Tales like Ash and Roses deal with the aftermath of The Dalek Masterplan, leading into the first Doctor's role in The Five Doctors - and then the framing story of The Witch Hunters clearly indicates that the Doctor has been given some freedom by Rassilon. I have interpreted this as meaning he now has a degree of control over the Tardis - this deals with the main objection to inserting extra stories here, that the Doctor would never be able to get back to pick up Steven. I also like the idea that the Doctor has glimpsed some of his future during his mindlink with his other incarnations - hence he can sign Rebecca Nurse's release papers with the name Benjamin Jackson - and he is clearly aware of his coming regeneration. This fits with the notion of him taking some time out, checking up on his grandchildren, and so on.
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Where did John and Gillian go?
At the end of The Experimenters, the Doctor leads his grandchildren back to the Tardis to head off on another adventure. When we next see them, in The Extortioner, they are waiting inside the Tardis for the second Doctor who's gone outside to explore on his own. There's no comment about the Doctor's change of appearance, and interestingly enough, they never call him grandfather again. I'd suggest there's an unseen story here where the first Doctor takes his grandchildren forward and hands them into the safe keeping of the second - perhaps telling them he's a friend who'll look after them from now on. This might also explain why the second Doctor leaves them inside the Tardis at first - he's uncertain about this new responsibility and doesn't want to expose them to danger, and has perhaps forgotten how resourceful they can be. Indeed, he comes back saying he missed their assistance and will take them with him in future.
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Future Imperfect
We have to take a bit of a leap here. As written, the story seems to takes place at the end of The Mind Robber, with the Doctor encountering Gulliver again in the Land of Fiction. It then transpires that Gulliver is in fact Goth (a joke based on the fact that actor Bernard Horsfall played both parts), and this leads into the second Doctor's involvement in The Three Doctors. But this doesn't work because The Three Doctors must clearly take place after The Invasion, as the Doctor recognizes Benton and talks about the Cybermen. In The Three Doctors, we see the second Doctor run out of a building on a fog-covered landscape, implying he's lifted from an otherwise unseen adventure. I suggest that he's disorientated by being lifted from his timestream, and temporarily believes himself to be still in the Land of Fiction when he meets Goth - perhaps he even assumes that The Invasion was all a fantasy.
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The Eye of the Giant/The Scales of Injustice
There are a few inconsistencies apparent during the early years of the third Doctor's exile on Earth, notably around events like Mike Yates joining UNIT, and Liz Shaw's decision to leave. Though a few details here and there don't match up, most of the information we receive is broadly consistent. The young Lieutenant Yates get seconded to UNIT (Vengeance of the Stones), promoted to Captain, in time to clear up the aftermath of the Auton invasion - remains as a background character (the "new Captain" mentioned in The Blue Tooth) - and finally moves up to become the Brigadier's second in command prior to Terror of the Autons. Meanwhile, The Blue Tooth sees Liz starting to think about leaving the Doctor - she spends some time away from UNIT in The Devil Goblins from Neptune, and is definitely considering her future plans in Reconnaissance and Country of the Blind before making her final departure in Prisoners of the Sun. It's only the novels The Eye of the Giant and The Scales of Injustice that seem really out of step with this pattern. In the latter, Liz makes a different and seemingly quite final decision to depart UNIT - whilst Mike Yates is only a Sergeant in these tales and gets promoted to Captain right at the end. (I'll leave aside the fact that such a promotion seems militarily unlikely - if not downright impossible.) I speculate therefore that when the Doctor crosses to the parallel universe in Inferno, he breaks open the dimensional barriers and allows some quantum instability to flood into our universe, creating a jumble of overlapping timelines. The broad flow of events is more or less the same, but a lot of the details are different and shifting - which covers these inconsistencies. We might also note that an alternative timeline is established and then deleted in Prisoners of the Sun as well - as this involves some Time Lord intervention, it might help explain why things return to normal after this.)
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The Ultimate Adventure
This is my attempt to explain Jon Pertwee's being replaced by an understudy part-way into a performance of the play - to acknowledge how the audience would have experienced it. I also want to establish the David Banks interpretation as being more than just an alternative reality - but that he actually exists somewhere in the quantum universe. I like the idea that Jason and Crystal can exist in these two separate timelines - combining this with my speculations on the sixth Doctor's version of this adventure fits rather neatly with the story Face Value, in which Crystal can somehow remember all three stage Doctors.
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Regeneration Crisis
Here, I'm trying to place these stories as they would have been originally perceived by the audience - between the Doctor's tv incarnations - which means they have to take place after the Doctor's escape from Metebelis 3. Conventional wisdom has it that the Doctor's body is destroyed by the radiation in the Great One's cave - but he's well enough to escape from the mountain and make it back to the Tardis. I suggest that the radiation poisoning is slow-acting and cumulative. In Love and War, we learn that it takes ten years for the Doctor's body to slowly decay before he makes it back to UNIT HQ, which seems to back up this assumption, and gives us scope for additional adventures during the early stages of the radiation poisoning. One of the effects is a gradual breakdown of the morphic structure of the Doctor's body - which accounts for why he looks slightly different from normal in Aladdin. (Other than the fact that stuntman Terry Walsh is standing in for Pertwee here.) In Seven Keys to Doomsday, the Doctor is making an archaeological expedition to the ruins of Karn - I suggest that the Doctor now believes he has beaten off the worst of the radiation and is on the road to recovery, despite (or perhaps because of) his malleable physical appearance. However, he is wounded in an ambush on Karn, and this appears to be the cause of his regeneration. It's interesting that the new Doctor becomes lucid and normal-acting almost immediately, without any of the usual post-regenerative instability. I speculate that what we're seeing here is not a full regeneration, but an emergency process triggered by the Tardis in an attempt to stabilize the Doctor's body and halt the effects of the radiation - imprinting a new physical form, perhaps drawn from a bank of templates (maybe one of those "standard" faces offered to the Doctor by the Tribunal at the end of The War Games). So Trevor Martin is not playing a new incarnation of the Doctor, but the third Doctor temporarily modified into a new form. Although this appears initially to be successful, I'd suggest that the radiation damage is too far advanced, leaving the Doctor unable to maintain this new form - so that he ultimately reverts back to his dying third incarnation. This is supported by the events of Ancient Whispers, where the weakened Doctor is unsure of his chances of achieving a successful regeneration without outside assistance.
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Robot
Although the end of Robot would seem to lead into The Ark in Space and thus the whole Nerva Beacon/time ring arc, Death Flower! opens with the Doctor and Sarah both commenting on the novelty of his new face, indicating that it takes place soon after the regeneration. So it seems that the Tardis trip at the end of Robot is no more than a quick bit of showing-off to Harry.
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The Changing Face of Doctor Who
This is an attempt to explain some of the TV Comic strips being re-drawn with Tom Baker's face. Interference, by altering the end of the Doctor's third incarnation, gives a plausible reason why some of his later adventures might be written out of the timeline. As for the other redrawn strips, (one dating back as far as the second Doctor) any number of factors could have removed them from the original continuity - further mucking about by Faction Paradox, the actions of the Time Lords or the Celestial Intervention Agency. Who knows? What it means is that there are certain key events in the Doctor's past that are now missing from history, and need to be relived to ensure the continued integrity of the timeline. The Doctor initiates this himself in the case of Shada, but there doesn't seem to be any such conscious action at work here. Is the Tardis seeking out these areas of instability in an attempt to protect the Doctor's timeline? Or is there some universal force at work? It may be significant that these repeated stories take place here, between The Invasion of Time when the Doctor communes with the Matrix, and his first meeting with the White Guardian in The Ribos Operation. In the case of Doomcloud, the divergence from the previously established history is quite drastic: in the new timeline, Sarah Jane is replaced by Joan Brown, and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart by General Maxwell-Lennon - although it's interesting to note that at one point, the Doctor calls Joan "Sarah", as if on a subconscious level, he's aware of the previous iteration of these events.
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Tegan comes back
In Lonely Days, Nyssa feels that she will be reunited with Tegan very soon. This might have seemed plausible when the story was written, but since then the plethora of stories occurring before Arc of Infinity make her cosmic intuition seem a bit over-hopeful. There is an answer however, and it comes from trying to fit in the stories from the 1983 Annual. These feature Nyssa and Tegan as companions, which suggests a setting after Adric's death - but Tegan is still a stewardess, which puts them before Arc of Infinity. So after the initial grieving for Adric stories, I postulate that the Doctor returns for Tegan, perhaps in an attempt to cheer Nyssa up. Fortunately, the last Annual story is set at Heathrow airport again - so we can imagine Tegan leaving once more at the end of that, and all references in subsequent stories to her being left behind at Heathrow still work.
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Frobisher
The author of Mission: Impractical suggests the novel is set between the comic strips War-Game and Funhouse. He's obviously forgotten that the comics featured Peri, placing them before The Trial of a Time Lord, whereas his book is definitely post-Trial. This opens up the possibility of Frobisher travelling with the Doctor both before and after his trial (and indeed he later partners the seventh Doctor for a while). I see Frobisher as having become a character more akin to the Brigadier - a friend of the Doctor's whom he sometimes visits and involves in his adventures. A couple of the stories in this section start with Frobisher apart from the Doctor, implying that he's starting to move away from being a companion.
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Mel Meets Evelyn
The Doctor takes Mel to meet Evelyn in Instruments of Darkness, and the story ends with the three of them departing for the Eye of Orion together, and the implication that the Doctor will subsequently return Evelyn to her own time. In Thicker Than Water, we see that Evelyn in fact travelled with the Doctor to Világ, and remained behind there. Mel and the Doctor later arrive on the planet and Mel meets Evelyn, seemingly for the first time again. My suggestion is that after Evelyn is taken home, she decides she doesn't want to return to her old life. The Doctor agrees to take her for a couple more trips, whilst Mel has some reason for remaining behind. While the Doctor is away, Mel is snatched out of time to testify at the Doctor's trial. The process causes Mel some recent memory loss, which is why she can't remember having met Evelyn before.
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Ground Zero
This story represents one of the biggest contradictions in the continuity, as it features the death of Ace when she's still a teenager - whereas in the novels, Ace grows to adulthood without dying. We can perhaps reconcile the two different versions with reference to The Glorious Dead - if we see Ace's death as the first event of the distorted timeline which is erased when Kroton restores the universe to its proper course. However, the story of how the older seventh Doctor came to be travelling with the younger Ace once more is something that has yet to be revealed. (Some have suggested that it's the Ace clone created in Lungbarrow - but really, where's the emotional resonance in depicting her death? We're obviously meant to feel the Doctor's loss of the same Ace we've known through the last several years of adventures.) One possibility is that the Doctor picks up Ace during the period when she is visiting the Cretaceous period - before she meets up with his younger self - perhaps hoping to pre-empt or alter some of the events that will shortly befall her.
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After Interference
One of the biggest problems with fitting the eighth Doctor's era together is the fact that there were three separate ongoing storylines in different media. How do the comics fit with the audios, and how do they fit with the books? One notion is to regard them as separate and distinct segments of the eighth Doctor's life, perhaps with many years between. The only problem with this is that both comics and audios feature Gallifrey, and Gallifrey is destroyed halfway through the book line. By implication, the comics and audios need to fit somewhere before The Ancestor Cell. (Yes, I know Gallifrey must be restored at some point in order to be destroyed again in the Time War - but it has always seemed unrealistic to me that Gallifrey would be restored exactly as it was before, with the same people and everything. Only the knowledge in the Matrix is saved, the new world built on that foundation might be weird, wonderful and completely unrecognizable.) So, we need to find a gap in the book line where the other stories can plausibly fit. There's been a tendency to seize upon almost any moment when the Doctor is temporarily without his companions to crowbar in any number of adventures - but I don't believe the Doctor would willingly leave his current companions behind for extended periods. (He leaves Sam for a while prior to Vampire Science, but I think that gap is too early in his life for some of these cataclysmic events.) The only conceivable gap is after Interference. The structure of the novel actually supports this. It starts with the Doctor travelling alone, and the main body of the story is a flashback - by the end of which, Sam has left him and Fitz is dead. True, he's being recreated by the Tardis's memory banks, but we don't really know how long that process might take. Nor has Compassion actually become a companion yet: there's no moment in Interference where she's actually shown joining the crew - and indeed when Foreman asks the Doctor what he did with her, he side-steps the issue. In the next novel, the Doctor, Fitz and Compassion are simply depicted as the current Tardis crew, but the formation of that team is something we don't see that happen - nor are we told what the Doctor got up to on his solo travels in the meantime.
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After The Gallifrey Chronicles
Though we know his eventual fate, details are still sketchy regarding the later years of the eighth Doctor's life. I presume that after defeating the Vore, he restores Gallifrey - who knows how long that might take nor how long for Gallifrey to become a major galactic power once again? I think we could be looking at centuries before the last Time War takes place. We see mere glimpses (albeit interspersed with a few extensively detailed sequences) of different periods of the Doctor's life after this point: travelling with new companions like Ayfai; a period working for the UN in the year 2040; more adventures with Destrii; commemorating a companion who died fighting against a dictator; a lengthy period travelling with Lucie - including a 600 year exile on the planet Orbis; and finally founding a scientific institute with other time travelling beings. There could be hundreds of years between all these events - before eventually, the Doctor becomes caught up in the Time War, events ultimately leading to his death.
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The Dalek Factor
This is a story in which the author has deliberately not specified which Doctor is involved. (There are a few stories like this. I'm not talking about Unbound or parallel timelines or imagined future incarnations here, but instances where the author has left it to our imaginations.) Anyone who's been following this site for some time will see that I've changed my mind quite a few times on the placing of this one. But with the latest turn of events, it seems that the War Doctor fits this story best - who else might be a prisoner of the Daleks for some unspecified length of time? We know that the War Doctor ages considerably during his lifetime. Obviously, he eventually escapes from the Daleks...
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The last great Time War
Before we knew of the War Doctor's existence, we didn't really have any idea about what the Doctor did in the Time War, nor indeed which incarnation was involved. There was a school of thought in fandom that it was the eighth Doctor who fought in the War, and that he regenerated as a consequence of injuries sustained. However, it seems this was never the intent of the show's producers. We might note that they were happy enough at the time of the show's relaunch for the eighth Doctor's regeneration to have been depicted in the spin-off media - and indeed there were advanced plans for it to appear in the comic strip. Ultimately, this was not followed up and the eighth Doctor's comic strips concluded with a more open ending - but the fact that it was even mooted with the producers' full blessing demonstrates clearly that they did not intend to suggest the eighth Doctor had perished in the act of ending the War. Consequently, I always proceeded on the assumption that it was the ninth Doctor who fought in the war. And as it turns out, that was indeed the case - but the ninth Doctor wasn't who we thought he was! (The Time War is - indirectly - the reason for the eighth Doctor's death, and his ultimate decision to become the War Doctor.) We still don't know many of the details of the War Doctor's life - though he appears to age greatly during the course of the War, implying that he fights it for a very long time.
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Post-War Doctor
We don't know how long the ninth Doctor has been around before he first appears. There's a throwaway moment in Rose when he catches a glimpse of his face in the mirror and comments on his ears, which led many to assume that he had only recently regenerated. I didn't regard that as particularly conclusive evidence (and I suspect it was only there to give fans who crave such things a post-regeneration scene). We have to balance that against the conflicting evidence suggesting the ninth Doctor has been around for a while, such as the images Clive has been collecting - one of which shows the Doctor in a completely different period costume. Also notice that the War Doctor, very shortly before his regeneration, gives his age as 800 - even allowing for the usual amount of flexibility and latitude in the Doctor's age, this seems to quite deliberately suggest that the ninth Doctor will live for at least a century before the 2005 series. On the other hand, The Beast of Babylon plainly states that the Doctor had only recently regenerated when he met Rose, although I think it's ambiguously enough worded (the Doctor talks about his shell not having hardened yet) to give us some wriggle room here. I can envisage the Doctor, war-scarred and shellshocked, and driven by his survivor guilt to try and make amends for what he believes his previous incarnation to have done - hence actions like saving the Daniels family from the Titanic - acting on a kind of desperate instinct, before his personality starts to settle down. So that could suggest a lengthy period during which he might consider himself to still be newly regenerated, time in which he has to adjust to being the Doctor again. So I'm proceeding from the premise that what we see in the 2005 series is not the ninth Doctor's entire life, but merely the last few months.
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Human Nature
One of the more controversial aspects of modern continuity is the show's adapting of previously-published spin-off stories into new tv episodes - and that's demonstrated most blatantly with this episode based on the seventh Doctor novel of the same name. This isn't the place to get into a discussion of what is and isn't canon, but I will note that some fans who wish to exclude them try to use this episode as "proof" that the novels don't count - on the grounds that the Doctor couldn't have the same adventure twice, and that the tv version had to trump the novel. (Even despite the fact that the novel existed first!) We should however take note of the fact that the tv story is not simply a straight adaptation of the novel. There are differences in the characters, and the time period - and most importantly, the Doctorís reasons for becoming human are completely different. The villains of the piece arenít the same either. So I contend that the original version must still have happened to the seventh Doctor in one version of the timeline - otherwise, the Aubertides would never have been defeated. There could be many reasons why this original timeline was undone. (The common explanation these days is that it happened because of the Time War...) Of course, a different version of the same adventure occurring to more than one Doctor is nothing new. I've already dealt with The Ultimate Adventure, Shada and the redrawn TV Comic strips. As with those, Iíd suggest that the Doctor is drawn on some subconscious level towards such areas of quantum instability, as if feeling the need to restore missing sections of his timeline. Alternatively, it may be that the Tardis is deliberately seeking out these space-time discontinuities. After all, when the Doctor activates the chameleon arch, he leaves all the details to the Tardis: creating a credible backstory and finding the right setting for the John Smith schoolmaster persona. Though the Doctor may not himself recall the events of the original Human Nature, we can imagine that the Tardis on some quantum level retains that knowledge in its memory banks, and automatically draws upon it to create the Doctorís new human form; and in locating a setting in which to place him, homes in on an area of quantum instability to try and protect the integrity of the Doctorís timeline.
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The Complete Adventures